Careers

Career Outlook

Careers in the Allied Health Industry

Medical Industry Outlook

The healthcare industry is projected to grow significantly over the next decade. This is mainly because of the baby boomer generation reaching retirement age and their increasing need for health care attention. Also contributing to this projected growth are the millions of Americans who now have access to health care through the Affordable Care Act.

With such a large demand for patient care, it’s no surprise there will also be an increase in demand for health care workers. The following are some of the more popular careers in the healthcare field that are projected to grow substantially over the years to come.

TOP CAREERS IN ALLIED HEALTHCARE:

Medical Administrative Assistant

  • Job Description: A medical administrative assistant is in charge of seeing out the daily operations in a medical or healthcare facility. Duties include everything from ordering supplies to taking a patient’s vital signs depending on the type of office and its needs.
  • Job Outlook: As stated earlier, the medical industry is constantly expanding due to an increasing population. Because of this, jobs for medical assistants are expected to grow an average of 29% by 2022* this is much faster than the majority of jobs in all other industries.
  • Wage: The annual national wage for medical assistants in 2012 was $29,370.* Some parts of the country have higher wages than others depending on location and population. Large metropolitan areas tend to have the highest paying and most available positions.
  • Education Requirements: Generally, medical assistants have a high school education and at least some sort of secondary education such as a medical program certificate.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Medical Assistants, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-assistants.htm (visited August 27, 2014).

Medical Coder

  • Job Description: Medical coders are tasked with assigning the appropriate codes to reflect a doctor’s diagnosis. These codes help keep accurate records of a patient’s medical history and help provide medical information to a patient’s insurance provider for billing.
  • Job Outlook: The future for medical coders looks bright for the decades to come. With an increasing population and changing of industry standards for the medical coding classification system, there will be a strong demand for coders who understand the new coding system.
  • Wage: The average wage for medical coders was $34,160 in 2012 with top 10 percent of coders earning over $56,000.* Wage varies depending on experience and location.
  • Education Requirements: Medical coders need to have a strong understanding of the human body. This can be achieved by taking anatomy and physiology courses at a college level. A medical coding certificate program can help you reach this goal. After which, it is also recommended to take and pass a state Certified Professional Coder exam.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Medical Records and Health Information Technicians, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm (visited August 27, 2014).

Medical Biller

  • Job Description: A medical biller is responsible for processing the insurance claims within a medical office or facility. After a patient has been diagnosed, the biller will send the appropriate paperwork to their insurer for payment. Some medical billers can even work from home depending on their job duties and requirements set in place by their employer.
  • Job Outlook: Doctor’s visits are on the rise due to an increasing population and a generation of baby boomers hitting retirement age. As a result, the role of medical billers is expected to expand 22 percent* over the next decade.
  • Wage: Medical billers made an average of $34,160 in 2012. The top 10 percent of medical billers made over $56,200. Several factors determine a medical biller’s salary which includes where they live, how much experience they have, and their education.
  • Education Requirements: To become a medical biller most healthcare facilities require at least a medical billing certificate or associate degree proving your knowledge of the human body and the medical coding system.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Medical Records and Health Information Technicians, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm (visited August 27, 2014).

Pharmacy Technician

  • Job Description: Pharmacy technicians generally work behind the counter at a pharmacy helping to count and dispense medications for customers. They’re tasked with assisting customers through their entire pharmacy experience and can help answer any questions they may have. Behind the scenes they will take inventories and keep supplies filled.
  • Job Outlook: The future for pharmacy technicians is on the upswing for the decades to come. The increase of the retirement age population will require more prescriptions to be filled as their years advance. Pharmacies will have to keep up with the increase in demands leading to more jobs at the position.
  • Wage: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average wage for a pharmacy technician was $29,320 in 2012.* The top 10 percent in this field earned more than $42,400 a year.
  • Education Requirements: Pharmacy technicians need at least a high school diploma to be considered for the position. However it is recommended to complete a post-secondary education such as a certificate program or a related associate degree program.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Pharmacy Technicians, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/pharmacy-technicians.htm (visited August 27, 2014).

Medical Office Manager

  • Job Description: Medical office managers are in charge of the daily operations in a medical facility. Typically they are responsible for keeping the office staffed, supervising employees, and making sure the office runs smoothly.
  • Job Outlook: Employment for medical office managers is expected to grow by 23 percent from now to 2022 accordingly to a Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Wage: The average wage for a medical office manager was $88,580. The top 10 percent of which earned more than $150,560 a year.*
  • Education Requirements: Most medical office managers have significant work experience in the field and usually start off in an entry-level position like an office assistant before they step into the role of manager. A degree in Medical Office Management is recommended for those looking to move up in their career.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Medical and Health Services Managers, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm (visited August 27, 2014).

Allied Health Certificates
Allied Health certificate programs are designed to help students gain valuable knowledge and the skills necessary to land a new career in the healthcare industry.

Associate Degree

This program is designed for students who seek to possess a complete framework in basic medical office management concepts and skills in order to contribute and create solutions for contemporary medical office management problems.

Credit By Exam

If you’re already proficient in certain medical areas, there’s no need to sit through an entire semester of classes to earn the credit. Show what you know by taking advantage of Allied’s Credit-by-Exam option.